1. Day 205: I have been at this old abandoned water tower along the lakeshore near Long Branch several times before, and since I was working close by paid it another visit today. I’m still amazed that kids have managed to climb up there.

    Day 205: I have been at this old abandoned water tower along the lakeshore near Long Branch several times before, and since I was working close by paid it another visit today. I’m still amazed that kids have managed to climb up there.

    2 years ago  /  2 notes

  2. Day 184: After a great weekend up north, today was the all about the drive home. I took Hwy. 69 south from Sudbury, which has quite a few abandoned properties along it’s length between Parry Sound and Sudbury. Gas stations, motels, and even a missile base. I stopped for a few, including this gas station, just north of Britt. To get an idea of just how long this has been closed, besides the obvious age of the pump itself, a nearby sign had the price of gas at 70 cents a litre.

    Day 184: After a great weekend up north, today was the all about the drive home. I took Hwy. 69 south from Sudbury, which has quite a few abandoned properties along it’s length between Parry Sound and Sudbury. Gas stations, motels, and even a missile base. I stopped for a few, including this gas station, just north of Britt. To get an idea of just how long this has been closed, besides the obvious age of the pump itself, a nearby sign had the price of gas at 70 cents a litre.

    2 years ago  /  7 notes

  3. Day 183: Spent the morning caching around Sudbury, before heading out to the Capreol area, and north of Lake Wahnapitae. This tractor I found abandoned in a field, while walking to a cache in the westend of Sudbury….

    Day 183: Spent the morning caching around Sudbury, before heading out to the Capreol area, and north of Lake Wahnapitae. This tractor I found abandoned in a field, while walking to a cache in the westend of Sudbury….

    2 years ago  /  3 notes

  4. Day 175: Spent a great day hiking the Friendship Trail near Port Colborne, and stopped at Jordan Harbour with a few other cachers on the way home. This abandoned ship, modeled after Jacque Cartier’s Grande Hermine, in which he discovered the St. Lawrence estuary in 1535. The original wooden hull was destroyed in a fire, leaving it in its current state.
More info & pics

    Day 175: Spent a great day hiking the Friendship Trail near Port Colborne, and stopped at Jordan Harbour with a few other cachers on the way home. This abandoned ship, modeled after Jacque Cartier’s Grande Hermine, in which he discovered the St. Lawrence estuary in 1535. The original wooden hull was destroyed in a fire, leaving it in its current state.

    More info & pics

    2 years ago  /  18 notes

  5. Day 164: Grabbed today’s shot nice and close to home, something I keep meaning to stop and shoot. I grew up in the printing trade, with a family business, and even used  commercial printing techniques such as offset, letterpress and even stone litho in printmaking projects when I attended OCA. The small print shop my family ran, whose work was largely business cards, letterheads and such, eventually closed as digital processes provided a product at a much cheaper price. The growth in digital imaging has affected the trade at all levels, so today’s image has some meaning to me. The double exposure is the result of moving the camera near the end of the long exposure. I also desaturated some colour for the final result.

    Day 164: Grabbed today’s shot nice and close to home, something I keep meaning to stop and shoot. I grew up in the printing trade, with a family business, and even used ┬ácommercial printing techniques such as offset, letterpress and even stone litho in printmaking projects when I attended OCA. The small print shop my family ran, whose work was largely business cards, letterheads and such, eventually closed as digital processes provided a product at a much cheaper price. The growth in digital imaging has affected the trade at all levels, so today’s image has some meaning to me. The double exposure is the result of moving the camera near the end of the long exposure. I also desaturated some colour for the final result.

    2 years ago  /  0 notes

  6. Day 138: I headed down to Marie Curtis Park on the lakeshore in Mimico after work today to find an appropriately named geoache called “Trigger Happy”. After shooting some photos down here before, I had researched the area a bit and discovered that it was once owned by the Department of National Defense, and was an aerodrome, and had read that there was the remains of a shooting range down here. Todays shot is a large concrete structure used as a target it would seem, as the upper level wall is riddled with what looks like the marks left from artillery. I also used my iPhone today, which I haven’t done in a while, but only because I managed to bring my DSLR without a CF card loaded.

    Day 138: I headed down to Marie Curtis Park on the lakeshore in Mimico after work today to find an appropriately named geoache called “Trigger Happy”. After shooting some photos down here before, I had researched the area a bit and discovered that it was once owned by the Department of National Defense, and was an aerodrome, and had read that there was the remains of a shooting range down here. Todays shot is a large concrete structure used as a target it would seem, as the upper level wall is riddled with what looks like the marks left from artillery. I also used my iPhone today, which I haven’t done in a while, but only because I managed to bring my DSLR without a CF card loaded.

    2 years ago  /  0 notes

  7. Day 128: I revisited the same location as my Day 5 photo, which is conveniently located just down the road from me. I had hoped that access to the building was still available like it was during that previous visit, which was without my DSLR and tripod. Unfortunately it is sealed up tight. The grafitti on the concrete barrier seems like a reminder to stop and THINK before proceeding any closer, something I chose not to do this time around.

    Day 128: I revisited the same location as my Day 5 photo, which is conveniently located just down the road from me. I had hoped that access to the building was still available like it was during that previous visit, which was without my DSLR and tripod. Unfortunately it is sealed up tight. The grafitti on the concrete barrier seems like a reminder to stop and THINK before proceeding any closer, something I chose not to do this time around.

    2 years ago  /  1 note

  8. Day 101: I have passed the location for today’s shot many times and always wanted to stop and get a closer look. Near Long Branch, on the Lakeshore is a 100 acre abandoned site that was once Canada’s first aerodrome, and Canada’s first flying training school. The aerodrome was opened on May 20, 1915 by Curtiss Aeroplanes and Motors Company for the Royal Flying Corps. Aircraft such as the Curtiss JN-4 soon became a common sight at the airfield, which included 3 aircraft hangars.

"In January 1917, the newly designated Royal Flying Corps, Canada, the forerunner to the Royal Canadian Air Force, opened the RFC Training Centre at Long Branch. The Long Branch training centre also provided instruction on flying boats at nearby Hanlon’s Point in Toronto Harbour, the first seaplane base in Canada.
By July 1917, the flight school re-located to the Armour Heights Aerodrome. Long Branch became the Cadet Ground Training School for the Royal Flying Corps. Both the school and the aerodrome closed in 1919.
Not the slightest trace remains of the airfield today. From 1962 - 2005, the property was Ontario Power Generation’s Lakeview Generating Station. The only remnants of the aerodrome’s facilities are the water tower, a concrete wall (possibly one the backstop for the small arms range) and some wooden walls (possibly part of an obstacle course).

The water tower now dominates the property, and was the focus of my visit, though I wouldn’t mind locating what else there remains….

    Day 101: I have passed the location for today’s shot many times and always wanted to stop and get a closer look. Near Long Branch, on the Lakeshore is a 100 acre abandoned site that was once Canada’s first aerodrome, and Canada’s first flying training school. The aerodrome was opened on May 20, 1915 by Curtiss Aeroplanes and Motors Company for the Royal Flying Corps. Aircraft such as the Curtiss JN-4 soon became a common sight at the airfield, which included 3 aircraft hangars.

    "In January 1917, the newly designated Royal Flying Corps, Canada, the forerunner to the Royal Canadian Air Force, opened the RFC Training Centre at Long Branch. The Long Branch training centre also provided instruction on flying boats at nearby Hanlon’s Point in Toronto Harbour, the first seaplane base in Canada.

    By July 1917, the flight school re-located to the Armour Heights Aerodrome. Long Branch became the Cadet Ground Training School for the Royal Flying Corps. Both the school and the aerodrome closed in 1919.

    Not the slightest trace remains of the airfield today. From 1962 - 2005, the property was Ontario Power Generation’s Lakeview Generating Station. The only remnants of the aerodrome’s facilities are the water tower, a concrete wall (possibly one the backstop for the small arms range) and some wooden walls (possibly part of an obstacle course).

    The water tower now dominates the property, and was the focus of my visit, though I wouldn’t mind locating what else there remains….

    2 years ago  /  0 notes

  9. Day 93: Spent some time after work, wandering around the site of the abandoned Westwood Theatre in the city’s westend. Opened in 1952, it survived until it’s closure in 1998, and it has sat empty since then. Atop the building and visible from a distance is a large neon sign with a missing “D” on the “Westwood”, a supposed victim from a staged explosion during the filming of “Resident Evil: The Apocalypse” (2004).

    Day 93: Spent some time after work, wandering around the site of the abandoned Westwood Theatre in the city’s westend. Opened in 1952, it survived until it’s closure in 1998, and it has sat empty since then. Atop the building and visible from a distance is a large neon sign with a missing “D” on the “Westwood”, a supposed victim from a staged explosion during the filming of “Resident Evil: The Apocalypse” (2004).

    2 years ago  /  0 notes

  10. Day 65: Went for a hike in one of my favourite areas today, the Nashville Resource Management Area near Bolton. A property that was acquired by the Toronto Regional Conservation Authority, it is currently being assessed and slowly developed for future use. I visited a few geocaches I own, and deployed a couple of Munzees, including one at the remains of this building, constructed in 1952, and once part of a farm. I decided to get a little creative with the shadows and light, and keep it simple with a black and white treatment.

    Day 65: Went for a hike in one of my favourite areas today, the Nashville Resource Management Area near Bolton. A property that was acquired by the Toronto Regional Conservation Authority, it is currently being assessed and slowly developed for future use. I visited a few geocaches I own, and deployed a couple of Munzees, including one at the remains of this building, constructed in 1952, and once part of a farm. I decided to get a little creative with the shadows and light, and keep it simple with a black and white treatment.

    2 years ago  /  0 notes

  11. Day 59: A little more urban exploring today… well not so urban really. I was on the Caledon Trailway finding a cache and a couple new Munzees, one of which brought me to the Cheltenham Brickworks. Took lots of the usual shots of the buildings, but decided to explore a little further….

    Day 59: A little more urban exploring today… well not so urban really. I was on the Caledon Trailway finding a cache and a couple new Munzees, one of which brought me to the Cheltenham Brickworks. Took lots of the usual shots of the buildings, but decided to explore a little further….

    2 years ago  /  2 notes

  12. Day 53: The old Canada Linseed Oil Company plant at  40 Wabash Avenue in Parkdale was abandoned in the 70’s. It now sits,  fenced off in a corner of Sorauren Avenue park, a piece of land that  once served as a TTC garage up to the 1980s
The city had planned to turn it into a municipal garage for  garbage trucks, until the communtiy stepped in to fight it, and a  community park was established in 1995. The 40,000 sq. ft solid concrete  building is to one day become a community centre.
More History and Info

    Day 53: The old Canada Linseed Oil Company plant at 40 Wabash Avenue in Parkdale was abandoned in the 70’s. It now sits, fenced off in a corner of Sorauren Avenue park, a piece of land that once served as a TTC garage up to the 1980s

    The city had planned to turn it into a municipal garage for garbage trucks, until the communtiy stepped in to fight it, and a community park was established in 1995. The 40,000 sq. ft solid concrete building is to one day become a community centre.

    More History and Info

    2 years ago  /  6 notes